4 Ways You Can Benefit From Pelvic Floor Therapy – The Wise Consumer

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4 Ways You Can Benefit From Pelvic Floor Therapy

October 5, 2022

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Pelvic Floor Therapy

4 Ways You Can Benefit From Pelvic Floor Therapy

Are you peeing your pants when you sneeze? Is intercourse painful? Do you suffer from constipation? If you’ve answered yes to any or all of these symptoms, you could be suffering from pelvic floor dysfunction. To be completely transparent, I knew close to nothing about my pelvic floor till after having a baby.

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Are you peeing when you sneeze, laugh, cough or exercise? Is intercourse painful? Do you suffer from constipation? If you’ve answered yes to one or all of these symptoms, you could be suffering from pelvic floor dysfunction. And, guess what, you’re not alone! In fact, according to John Hopkins Medicine, over 25 million adult Americans experience temporary or chronic urinary incontinence. And nearly 3 out of 4 women, reports the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, have pain during intercourse at some or another during their lives. 

So, it got me thinking, especially after having a baby, are these just issues we’re meant to endure for the rest of our lives? Should we just avoid intercourse because it’s painful? Always carry extra underwear or pads because we might pee our pants whenever we sneeze? Supplement our diet with excessive amounts of laxatives just to have a regular bowel movement? 

This can’t be. I refuse to accept that it’s “just the way it is.” There’s gotta be a better solution. And guess what, there is. It’s called pelvic floor therapy. 

The Benefits of Pelvic Floor Therapy

To be completely transparent, I knew close to nothing about my pelvic floor till after having a baby. Like most of you, I’d heard about kegels but, that was about it! I had no real concept of how our pelvic floor muscles functioned, the benefits of pelvic floor therapy, or how to strengthen or release muscles deep within the pelvic floor, let alone that you could strengthen or release tension in that part of your body. 

If you’re someone who struggles with pelvic floor dysfunction or you’re just looking to gain a better awareness of how your pelvic floor muscles function, you’re in the right place!

Today on the podcast I have the honor of chatting with Dr. Amanda Olson, a pelvic floor specialist and president and chief clinical officer of Intimate Rose where she develops pelvic health products and education.  Dr. Olson is passionate about empowering women and men with pelvic health issues including pelvic pain, incontinence, pregnancy, and post-partum issues. She has written newspaper and magazine articles on pelvic floor dysfunction, and running and also authored the book Restoring the Pelvic Floor For Women.

In this episode we talk about the importance of our pelvic floor muscles and how they function, how pelvic floor therapy can help with incontinence and constipation as well as improve your sex life, the difference between hypertonic and hypotonic pelvic floor muscles, what a dilator is and how to use it, how she went about designing the pelvic wand and how to use it, why going to the bathroom “just in case” can be problematic, and so much more!

Trust me, this is a conversation you don’t want to miss! Happy listening. 

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